Dark Choco Ferrero Rocher

How can you not love a raw, vegan treat? even more when it is a gooey, chocolaty bliss ball ?!?

This treat was inspired the other day when I was trying to come up with a healthy treat in the form of a ball after the yoga studio I go to asked me if I’d be interested in making healthy, vegan treats for them to sell in their studio hall. I got so excited, as it was kind of a dream come true. Of course, I said: YES!

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Delicious Raw, Vegan Bliss Ball

I love making my own raw, vegan and refined sugar free treats since I started my whole happy life adventure and started reading more about sugar and hidden sugars in our food. I even wrote a feature on sugar, which was my final project for a Freelance Journalism course I was doing last year at Edinburgh Uni. You can read the piece here: Let’s Talk Sugar . I have a sweet tooth and let me tell you it’s not easy to control it. What I’ve found that works for me is making my own treats at home so I’d know what goes into them eaxactly. I’d make enough for the whole week, so I can take them with me to work, or as a post yoga or gym snack.

So, the recipe is easy-peasy but really delish.

  1. stage: MAKING THE DOUGH
  • 1 cut nuts or brazil nuts
  • 1 1/2 mixed nuts (could be almond, cashews, walnuts)
  • 1/4 cup almond meal
  • 2-2 1/2 cups dates (either soaked in hot water for 30 min or add 2-3 tbs water to dough)
  • 1/3 cacao nibs (for extra crunchiness, optional)
  • 3/4 cup unsweatened cocoa powder
  • 1 tbs carob powder (optional)
  • pinch of salt; I like using pink himalayan salt

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I put nuts in food processor and pulse them until coarse. Then, add almond meal, cocoa nibs, salt, carob and dates and pulse until well combined. Then, add cocoa powder and mix all together until it forms a ball in the food processor. If you’d like it to be more gooey add a bit more water to the mixture.

I leave the dough in the fridge for 10-15 min and start forming balls, it makes about 10-14 balls. I set balls in the freezer for 30 min.

2. stage: MAKING RAW CHOCOLATE SAUCE

  • coconut oil
  • cacao butter (optional)
  • rice malt syrup or maple syrup
  • cocoa powder

For this I don’t use measures. I melt the coconut oil and cacao butter (roughly 4 tbs). I boil water in the kettle, pour water in a large mug, place the small bowl on top of it with the coconut oil in it and I wait for it melt. Once its melted, add rice malt syrup or maple syrup and slowly add cocoa powder. Pour the sauce over the balls and drizzle finely chopped nuts on them.

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Raw, vegan Dark Choco Ferrero Rocher

You’ll love these so much that you’d have to make them every week. They’re addictive!

Please visit me on FB: whole.happy.life or on Insta: @whole.happy.life
Drop me a line and let’s inspire each other for a whole, happier, life.

Much Love!

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Etcsokis Ferrero Rocher

 

  1. LEPES:
  • 1 bogre mogyoro
  • 1 1/2 dio, kesudio, mandula keverek
  • 1/4 bogre finomra daralt mandula
  • 2-2 1/2 datolya (ezeket feloraig aztatom, vagy vizet adok a keverekhez)
  • 1/3 bogre hantolt kakaobab, ez ropogosabba teszi a golyot
  • 3/4 cup kakaopor (szigoruan cukormentes)
  • 1 tbs carob por (elhagyhato)
  • kis so, en a himalajai sot szetem az ilyen edessegekhez hasznalni.

 

Robotgepbe beledobalom a mogyorot, diot stb, durvara daralom oket. Majd hozzaadom a finomra daralt mandulat, sot, kakaobabot, carob port (szentjanoskenyerfa por) es datolyat.  Ezt addig keverem, amig a massza nincs jol osszedolgozva. MAjd hozzaadom a kakaoport is, ha kell vizet, es addig keverem, amig a massza labdat nem alkot a robotgepben.

10-15 percig a hutobe rakom a masszat, majd golyokat formalok belole (10-14 golyo lesz belole), majd kb egy fel orara a melyhutobe rakom oket.

2. LEPES: Csokiszosz

  • kokuszolaj/ zsir
  • kakaovaj
  • rizsszirup vagy juharszirup
  • kakaopor

En itt szemmertekre dolgozom. Forrovizet ontok egy talba, majd a tetejere helyezek egy masik talat,  es igy a forro goz felett olvasztom meg a kokuszolajat (kb 4 ek, kakaovajat nem mindig adok hozza). Mikor megolvadt a kokuszolaj hozzadom a rizsszirupot, es lassan kanalankent adagolva hozzaadom a kakaoport. Ovatosan kell adagolni a kakaoport, mert ha tul sokat adunk az olajhoz nagyon suru lesz a csokiszosz es nem lehet onteni mar.

Ha elkeszult a szosz, raontom a golyokra, majd azokat megszorom durvara apritott mogyoroval vagy dioval. Szerintem isteniek ezek a golyok, es nagyon remelem nektek is izleni fog majd.

 

 

I’ve been spending quite a lot of time this week in the kitchen, in the gym and in the yoga studio. Hubby’s been away, so I had all the time to myself this week. It was a fun and active week, but I think I pushed past my limit and my body’s craving for rest. I was gonna go to the gym this evening but I’ve decided to stay home, chill and write this new blog post instead.

In my last blog post [ What Fit Means to Me ] I was telling you about what Fit means to me, and how my life’s changed for the better since I regularly exercise, practice yoga and try to eat consciously. So, here it continues.

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This fit lifestyle keeps teaching me patience every day. We want results Now, and we get so discouraged when we don’t see the results we had in mind. I think most of the time this is the very reason why people give up. Even after a year and a half, I’m still not there where I want to be. To be honest, I thought I would be there in 3-6 months. I disheartened many times, I was on the verge of giving up a couple of times. But I always realize, I’m not doing this for the six packs or the nice perky butt (although would be nice to have them, and hopefully  will do one day soon).

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@ Tribe Yoga Studio – chilling between a power yoga and a yin yoga class

 

I’m doing this because I love the post-bliss-state exercise and yoga put me. I love feeling strong and I love seeing even the tiniest results. All these keep me going and coming back for more.

Fit also taught me to be confident and comfortable in my body. To be happy in your body doesn’t depend on the size of the dress you wear, or the number your scale shows. Confidence and happiness radiate from inside. It’s a feeling of being healthy and active. And, I’m very positive that this can only be achieved through an active lifestyle. I’m not saying you have to go to the gym and do weights, or run 10 K every day… You have to find your own way of healthy and active, your own way of fit. For me, it’s a mix of yoga, hardcore training, where I can push myself to and over my limits (like bbg, insanity, bodyrock, weights training) and eating as healthy as possible.

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Post-yoga-bliss selfie from this week

Fit showed me the importance of balance. You can’t keep pushing yourself and training every day. Your body, mind, spirit need rest days. Your muscles need to recover. There were times, and I’m still struggling with this, when I’d feel bad about having a rest day. This is when I need to remind myself that loving my body is not just about being active and pushing it but also about giving my body the rest it deserves.

Also, you can’t eat clean all the time. You need those cheat meals, you need those treats sometimes. I have the sweetest tooth ever and I had to discover a way that works for me to keep it in balance. My way of balancing it is making my own raw, vegan treats. Like this I know all the ingredients that go in there. I make a batch for the week ahead, and I know whenever I feel like having something sweet, it’s there waiting for me in the fridge.

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Hungry? Raw, Vegan Snickers Bars to keep my sweet tooth in balance

I could write pages and pages about what this lifestyle has taught me so far. It keeps teaching me every day something new about myself, relationships and the world. I’ll be back soon to share more of my experiences.

Please visit my FB: https://www.facebook.com/wholehappylife/ and my IG: whole.happy.life and join me in this amazing journey. Let’s inspire each other to live a happier and healthier life.

Much Love to you all!

What Fit means to me?

To me, being fit is not only a physical but also a mental, and sort of spiritual state.
It’s the journey of learning to listen to my body, loving it and taking care of it.
To me, fit is accepting my limits and pushing through them. To me, fit is being in balance and in harmony. It’s a real chill pill, a happiness accelerator and a gratitude generator.

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Physical exercise has always been there for me as a clutch: in the midst of a distorted self-image during my teenage years, struggling with a slight eating disorder, through break-ups, heart aches, vogue ambitions, through low tides and high tides.

Physical exercise, together hand in hand with yoga now, still plays a massive role in my life. It keeps me sane and grounded. It gives me a healthy self-esteem and self-image.
My concept of fit has changed in the last one and a half years, though. Something switched in me, now I work out because I love my body, and not because I’m unhappy with it. And,  yes, it’s really the best therapy life can can offer.

I’ve learnt as well that fit doesn’t exist without eating healthy.  Nourishing your body with real food, will also nourish your mind and soul. I think self education is the key to understand what we put in our body as the food industry definitely does its best to hide the truth about certain ingredients. You have to do your research and reading. You have to experiment with ingredients to find out what works best for your body. You can’t eat clean all the time, cheat meals are essential, I believe, to achieve balance.

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(Although, I’m not vegan, I love making raw and vegan treats such as the above *raw carrot cake* )

From my experience, it’s a transition of months and years to find a healthy lifestyle that you can maintain. In order to make healthy choices, and to make those choices out of love and respect towards yourself and that you wouldn’t take those choices as restrictions,  you have to recondition your mind about eating.

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More to come about my Fit journey, about my whole happy life in my next post. If you’ve got any questions please ask. I’d be so happy to answer all your questions.

 

*Please visit my FB and IG for more healthy treats: https://www.facebook.com/wholehappylife

 

**All pictures were made by me, quotes from pinterest

Let’s Talk Sugar

Intro:
Hi guys,  This is a feature I wrote for a “Writing for Publication” course I’m doing at the University of Edinburgh. There’s a lot more to talk about when it comes to sugar, so I’m planning to write more blog posts on the subject. Till then I need to do more research and more “investigation.”  (I’m not a nutritionist, dietitian or health expert. I’ve been interested in the topic as I lost my grandpa to type 2 diabetes, and my granny is a type 2 sufferer, and I enjoy reading on the topic) Thanks guys for reading!


Is 2015 really the year of healthy? Sugar has been in the limelight in the media in 2015. It has been trending among health bloggers and Instagrammers. Social media is buzzing with pictures of healthy meals and ab selfies. Nutritionists, health specialists are frowning at high sugar consumption. Jamie Oliver started his crusade against sugar, lobbying for a sugar tax to save the nation. Newspapers and magazines have been giving increasing attention to health conditions linked to excessive sugar consumption such as: Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay, obesity.

Unfortunately statistics and social media trends are not in alignment. According to the NHS the obesity level trebled in the last 30 years, while the number of people who live with type 2 diabetes doubled since 1996. There are 3.9 million people in the UK living with diabetes, 90% of which are type 2 sufferers. As November is the National Diabetes Awareness Month let me take you on a journey to discover the modern-day life of sugar.

Is there such thing as healthy sugar?

“Sugar is sugar, whether it’s white, brown, unrefined sugar, molasses or honey, don’t kid yourself: there is no such thing as healthy sugar.” – Catherine Collins, NHS dietitian

Although it is not known where sugar originated, it is thought to have been used, along with honey as natural sweeteners for thousands of years. Sugar, once a luxury product known also as ”white gold,” enjoyed by a few only a couple of centuries ago, is now added and hidden, without any exaggeration, in most of our foods and drinks.

When we talk about sugar we need to differentiate between two types of sugar: natural and added sugars. Sugars found in vegetables, fruits (fructose), dairy products (lactose) are naturally occurring sugars, or “natural sugars.” Following the vocabulary of the NHS and World Health Organization, “free or added sugars” are sugars that are added to food in order to sweeten, enhance flavour, improve texture and preserve food.  Free sugar also naturally occurs in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates. They offer “empty calories” and no nutritional value and thus eating, drinking too much of them will result in adding extra calories and gaining weight.

How much is too much?

WHO recommends us to reduce our free sugar intake to less than 10% of our total energy intake, and encourages us to reduce it below 5% to gain further health benefits. Let’s talk facts: 5% of your daily calories is about 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of sugar. NHS claims that Britons eat more than three times more of the recommended sugar intake, about 700g of sugar a week that is 140 teaspoons per person.

Always check the ingredients list: if one of the various forms of sugar is high up on the list, it is high in sugar. “High-sugar food” contains more than 22.5g per 100g, on the other hand “low-sugar food” contains less than 5 g per 100g. Look for food with 5 g or less sugar in it per 100g. “High-sugar drink” contains 11.25g per 100 ml, a “low-sugar drink” contains less than 2.5g per 100ml.

Why does added sugar cause so much trouble?

To fully comprehend what sugar does to our body, we need to talk about sucrose, glucose and fructose. They are commonly referred to as “simple sugars” and are important carbohydrates. While they taste the same to our tongue buds, our body can differentiate between these sugars and are used and processed by our body differently.

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Sucrose is commonly known as table sugar, and is obtained from sugar cane or sugar beets. It is also found naturally in fruits and vegetables. When sucrose is consumed an enzyme separates it into glucose and fructose. Glucose, also known as blood sugar, circulates in our blood. Our body processes most carbohydrates into glucose and it is either used immediately for energy, or stored in our muscle cells, or in the liver as glycogen for later use. Fructose is found naturally in many fruits, and it is also added to soft drinks, fruit flavoured drinks, biscuits, cereals under the name of high-fructose corn syrup, a fructose-based sweetener. The absorption of fructose to our blood is very fast if the source is high-fructose corn syrup. Fructose can only be processed by the liver and thus it can increase its workload. It is highly addictive and makes us eat more as it has no corresponding “we’re full now, stop” switch in the brain. A study in The Journal of the American Medical Association looked at brain imaging scans after eating either fructose or glucose:

“fructose, but not glucose, altered blood flow in areas of the brain that stimulate appetite. When we take in high-fructose corn syrup and fructose, it stimulates appetite and causes us to eat more.”

Eating too much of the sugary stuff may affect your cardiovascular health and increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It may also lead to liver damage according to a research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It is a major contributor to tooth decay, weight gain and obesity. Added sugar boosts the levels of dopamine in the brain.

“Dopamine gives you a high, and that’s why the more sugar you eat, the more you think you want.” – Dr David M. Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor and the director of the Diabetes Centre

War against sugar: Is “sugar tax” the answer?

“We need lots of different approaches to help people reduce their free sugar intake. Although a taxation program wouldn’t solve the entire issue, using money raised could help improve nutrition education for the next generation or even subsidise fruit and vegetable for all.” – Lucy Jones, Dietetian

We saw how Jamie Oliver declared war on sugar earlier this year with his “Sugar Rush” campaign. Some argue taxation is not the way and money should be raised through different sources to support NHS and food education. Jamie Oliver argues that along with food education higher tax should be introduced on sugary drinks and foods to discourage people from consuming these products, just like in France, Mexico and Hungary.

The world-known chef, to prove his seriousness and passion, introduced a self-imposed levy in his restaurants from 1 September 2015. It is a levy of 20p/litre on soft drinks with added sugar. That is approximately 7p for a 330 ml can of fizzy drink. He says, “The levy is about raising money, but also about raising awareness of what sugary drinks do to our bodies.”

“I’ve never said ban sugary sweetened drinks, I’ve never said stop using it. I think there’s honest sugar and dishonest sugar. Surprisingly, I think a chocolate bar is quite honest, always being what it is. We’ve always  known a cake, or a bit of chocolate to be an indulgence. And, when there’s a humongous amount in sugary sweetened drinks, which just to remind you is the largest single source of sugar in our children’s and teenagers’ diet… that’s why I believe they earned the right to higher responsibility and in my opinion tax.” – Jamie Oliver

I had the chance to do an interview with a manager from one of Jamie’s Italian restaurants. I was really interested whether the self-imposed “sugar tax” made any difference so far and what was the reception among customers. ‘In general people are okay with the decision. Many of the customers saw the show on TV and they have a general idea what Jamie’s trying to do. Of course, there’re always people who don’t understand.’ said the manager. Change in the amount of soft drinks consumed in the restaurant due to the levy ‘is not noticeable,’ says the manager. Jamie claimed, during his hearing in front of the Health Select Committee in October, that there was a 6-7% drop in consumption of soft drinks in 46 restaurants. ‘At the moment 650 forward-thinking restaurants’ joined his movement and he is hoping this number will rise.

He is passionately campaigning for a healthier country, for a healthier next generation. He sees his tax plan as ‘incredibly pioneering,’ a solution to the devastating health state of the UK.

Let’s food educate!

The first and most important step when it comes to cutting down on sugar is food education: check the ingredients and the nutrition information panel. We consume more added sugar through processed food and sugary drinks than we might think: cakes, biscuits, cereals, chocolate, savoury food, non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks.

Manufacturers are not making our life easier. They can list sugars added to food and drinks under various names: table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, glucose, syrup, honey, fructose, molasses, fruit-juice concentrates, brown sugar, agave nectar, barley malt, evaporated cane juice, starch, maple syrup, rice syrup, ethyl maltol, corn sweetner.

Nutritionists, scientists, professors and personal trainers all agree that we can consume sugar in moderation. The key is treating sugary foods as a treat and not an everyday option for hydration and nourishment. We should opt for sugars that have less fructose content such as rice malt syrup, which is 100% fructose-free, or stevia, a plant-derived sweetener, which contains no sugar of any kind.

People do not like to be told what to eat or not to eat, and they should not be. Healthy means different to everyone. There has to be freedom of choice, but I firmly believe without food education and clarity in food labelling we cannot make the right choices. I cheer all the magazines, newspapers, health bloggers and Jamie Olivers for spreading the word, educating and inspiring us to live and eat healthier.

 

pictures: from Pinteres

Sugar: Aren’t we sweet enough?

 Aren’t we sweet enough?

Although it is not known where sugar originated, it is thought to have been used, along with honey as natural sweeteners for thousands of years. Sugar, once a luxury product, known also as ”white gold,” enjoyed by a few only a couple of centuries ago, has now been linked to health conditions such as: Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay and obesity.  Let me take you on a journey to discover together the history and modern day life of sugar.

Firstly, when we talk about sugar we need to differentiate between two types of sugars. Sugars found in vegetables, fruits, dairy products are naturally occurring sugars, or “natural sugars”, such as fructose and lactose. Following the vocabulary of the NHS and World Health Organization, I will call “free or added sugar” those sugars that are added to food in order to sweeten, enhance flavour and to preserve foods. Free sugars offer no nutritional value and thus eating, drinking too much of them will result in adding extra calories and gaining weight.

WHO recommends us to reduce our free sugar intake to less than 10% of our total energy intake, and encourages us to further reduce it below 5%. Let’s talk facts: 5% of your daily calories is about 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of sugar. NHS claims that Britons eat about 700g of sugar a week that is 140 teaspoons per person. That is more than three times more of the recommended sugar intake.

In my opinion, the first and most important step when it comes to cutting down on sugar is checking the nutrition information panel. We consume more added sugar through processed food and sugary drinks than we might think: cakes, biscuits, cereals, chocolate, savoury food, non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks. Sugars added to food and drinks can be listed under various names: table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, glucose, syrup, honey, dextrose, fructose, treacle, molasses, fruit-juice concentrates, brown sugar, agave nectar, barley malt, evaporated cane juice, caramel, carob syrup, beet sugar, galactose, icing sugar, invert sugar, maltodextrin, starch, raw sugar, sorbitol, muscovado, maple syrup, mannitol, panocha, rice syrup, diastase, ethyl maltol, sorghum syrup, dextran, diastatic malt, date sugar, turbinado, corn sweetner, maltotroise.

Always check the ingredients list: if one of the various forms of sugar is high up on the list, it is high in sugar. “High-sugar food” contains more than 22.5g per 100g, on the other hand “low-sugar food” contains less than 5 g per 100g. Look for food with 5 g or less sugar in it per 100g. “High-sugar drink” contains 11.25g per 100ml, a “low-sugar drink” contains less than 2.5g per 100ml. “Sugar is sugar, whether it’s white, brown, unrefined sugar, molasses or honey, don’t kid yourself: there is no such thing as healthy sugar”, reminds us NHS dietitian Catherine Collins.

I would like to make this post on sugar into a series of posts and talk about possible ways of cutting down on sugar, prevention and solutions. In order to make healthier choices, I think it is also very important to fully understand what happens to our body when we eat high-sugar foods. So, I would like to discuss the topic from that angle as well.

I hope you’ve found this post interesting and helpful. I really enjoyed reading and learning about sugar and wanted to share it with you.

picture from: pinterest

information from: http://www.nhs.uk ; http://www.who.int ; Health Magazin September 2015 issue, http://www.bda.uk.com