What Fit means to me?

To me, being fit is not only a physical but also a mental, and sort of spiritual state.
It’s the journey of learning to listen to my body, loving it and taking care of it.
To me, fit is accepting my limits and pushing through them. To me, fit is being in balance and in harmony. It’s a real chill pill, a happiness accelerator and a gratitude generator.

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Physical exercise has always been there for me as a clutch: in the midst of a distorted self-image during my teenage years, struggling with a slight eating disorder, through break-ups, heart aches, vogue ambitions, through low tides and high tides.

Physical exercise, together hand in hand with yoga now, still plays a massive role in my life. It keeps me sane and grounded. It gives me a healthy self-esteem and self-image.
My concept of fit has changed in the last one and a half years, though. Something switched in me, now I work out because I love my body, and not because I’m unhappy with it. And,  yes, it’s really the best therapy life can can offer.

I’ve learnt as well that fit doesn’t exist without eating healthy.  Nourishing your body with real food, will also nourish your mind and soul. I think self education is the key to understand what we put in our body as the food industry definitely does its best to hide the truth about certain ingredients. You have to do your research and reading. You have to experiment with ingredients to find out what works best for your body. You can’t eat clean all the time, cheat meals are essential, I believe, to achieve balance.

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(Although, I’m not vegan, I love making raw and vegan treats such as the above *raw carrot cake* )

From my experience, it’s a transition of months and years to find a healthy lifestyle that you can maintain. In order to make healthy choices, and to make those choices out of love and respect towards yourself and that you wouldn’t take those choices as restrictions,  you have to recondition your mind about eating.

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More to come about my Fit journey, about my whole happy life in my next post. If you’ve got any questions please ask. I’d be so happy to answer all your questions.

 

*Please visit my FB and IG for more healthy treats: https://www.facebook.com/wholehappylife

 

**All pictures were made by me, quotes from pinterest

Let’s Talk Sugar

Intro:
Hi guys,  This is a feature I wrote for a “Writing for Publication” course I’m doing at the University of Edinburgh. There’s a lot more to talk about when it comes to sugar, so I’m planning to write more blog posts on the subject. Till then I need to do more research and more “investigation.”  (I’m not a nutritionist, dietitian or health expert. I’ve been interested in the topic as I lost my grandpa to type 2 diabetes, and my granny is a type 2 sufferer, and I enjoy reading on the topic) Thanks guys for reading!


Is 2015 really the year of healthy? Sugar has been in the limelight in the media in 2015. It has been trending among health bloggers and Instagrammers. Social media is buzzing with pictures of healthy meals and ab selfies. Nutritionists, health specialists are frowning at high sugar consumption. Jamie Oliver started his crusade against sugar, lobbying for a sugar tax to save the nation. Newspapers and magazines have been giving increasing attention to health conditions linked to excessive sugar consumption such as: Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay, obesity.

Unfortunately statistics and social media trends are not in alignment. According to the NHS the obesity level trebled in the last 30 years, while the number of people who live with type 2 diabetes doubled since 1996. There are 3.9 million people in the UK living with diabetes, 90% of which are type 2 sufferers. As November is the National Diabetes Awareness Month let me take you on a journey to discover the modern-day life of sugar.

Is there such thing as healthy sugar?

“Sugar is sugar, whether it’s white, brown, unrefined sugar, molasses or honey, don’t kid yourself: there is no such thing as healthy sugar.” – Catherine Collins, NHS dietitian

Although it is not known where sugar originated, it is thought to have been used, along with honey as natural sweeteners for thousands of years. Sugar, once a luxury product known also as ”white gold,” enjoyed by a few only a couple of centuries ago, is now added and hidden, without any exaggeration, in most of our foods and drinks.

When we talk about sugar we need to differentiate between two types of sugar: natural and added sugars. Sugars found in vegetables, fruits (fructose), dairy products (lactose) are naturally occurring sugars, or “natural sugars.” Following the vocabulary of the NHS and World Health Organization, “free or added sugars” are sugars that are added to food in order to sweeten, enhance flavour, improve texture and preserve food.  Free sugar also naturally occurs in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates. They offer “empty calories” and no nutritional value and thus eating, drinking too much of them will result in adding extra calories and gaining weight.

How much is too much?

WHO recommends us to reduce our free sugar intake to less than 10% of our total energy intake, and encourages us to reduce it below 5% to gain further health benefits. Let’s talk facts: 5% of your daily calories is about 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of sugar. NHS claims that Britons eat more than three times more of the recommended sugar intake, about 700g of sugar a week that is 140 teaspoons per person.

Always check the ingredients list: if one of the various forms of sugar is high up on the list, it is high in sugar. “High-sugar food” contains more than 22.5g per 100g, on the other hand “low-sugar food” contains less than 5 g per 100g. Look for food with 5 g or less sugar in it per 100g. “High-sugar drink” contains 11.25g per 100 ml, a “low-sugar drink” contains less than 2.5g per 100ml.

Why does added sugar cause so much trouble?

To fully comprehend what sugar does to our body, we need to talk about sucrose, glucose and fructose. They are commonly referred to as “simple sugars” and are important carbohydrates. While they taste the same to our tongue buds, our body can differentiate between these sugars and are used and processed by our body differently.

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Sucrose is commonly known as table sugar, and is obtained from sugar cane or sugar beets. It is also found naturally in fruits and vegetables. When sucrose is consumed an enzyme separates it into glucose and fructose. Glucose, also known as blood sugar, circulates in our blood. Our body processes most carbohydrates into glucose and it is either used immediately for energy, or stored in our muscle cells, or in the liver as glycogen for later use. Fructose is found naturally in many fruits, and it is also added to soft drinks, fruit flavoured drinks, biscuits, cereals under the name of high-fructose corn syrup, a fructose-based sweetener. The absorption of fructose to our blood is very fast if the source is high-fructose corn syrup. Fructose can only be processed by the liver and thus it can increase its workload. It is highly addictive and makes us eat more as it has no corresponding “we’re full now, stop” switch in the brain. A study in The Journal of the American Medical Association looked at brain imaging scans after eating either fructose or glucose:

“fructose, but not glucose, altered blood flow in areas of the brain that stimulate appetite. When we take in high-fructose corn syrup and fructose, it stimulates appetite and causes us to eat more.”

Eating too much of the sugary stuff may affect your cardiovascular health and increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It may also lead to liver damage according to a research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It is a major contributor to tooth decay, weight gain and obesity. Added sugar boosts the levels of dopamine in the brain.

“Dopamine gives you a high, and that’s why the more sugar you eat, the more you think you want.” – Dr David M. Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor and the director of the Diabetes Centre

War against sugar: Is “sugar tax” the answer?

“We need lots of different approaches to help people reduce their free sugar intake. Although a taxation program wouldn’t solve the entire issue, using money raised could help improve nutrition education for the next generation or even subsidise fruit and vegetable for all.” – Lucy Jones, Dietetian

We saw how Jamie Oliver declared war on sugar earlier this year with his “Sugar Rush” campaign. Some argue taxation is not the way and money should be raised through different sources to support NHS and food education. Jamie Oliver argues that along with food education higher tax should be introduced on sugary drinks and foods to discourage people from consuming these products, just like in France, Mexico and Hungary.

The world-known chef, to prove his seriousness and passion, introduced a self-imposed levy in his restaurants from 1 September 2015. It is a levy of 20p/litre on soft drinks with added sugar. That is approximately 7p for a 330 ml can of fizzy drink. He says, “The levy is about raising money, but also about raising awareness of what sugary drinks do to our bodies.”

“I’ve never said ban sugary sweetened drinks, I’ve never said stop using it. I think there’s honest sugar and dishonest sugar. Surprisingly, I think a chocolate bar is quite honest, always being what it is. We’ve always  known a cake, or a bit of chocolate to be an indulgence. And, when there’s a humongous amount in sugary sweetened drinks, which just to remind you is the largest single source of sugar in our children’s and teenagers’ diet… that’s why I believe they earned the right to higher responsibility and in my opinion tax.” – Jamie Oliver

I had the chance to do an interview with a manager from one of Jamie’s Italian restaurants. I was really interested whether the self-imposed “sugar tax” made any difference so far and what was the reception among customers. ‘In general people are okay with the decision. Many of the customers saw the show on TV and they have a general idea what Jamie’s trying to do. Of course, there’re always people who don’t understand.’ said the manager. Change in the amount of soft drinks consumed in the restaurant due to the levy ‘is not noticeable,’ says the manager. Jamie claimed, during his hearing in front of the Health Select Committee in October, that there was a 6-7% drop in consumption of soft drinks in 46 restaurants. ‘At the moment 650 forward-thinking restaurants’ joined his movement and he is hoping this number will rise.

He is passionately campaigning for a healthier country, for a healthier next generation. He sees his tax plan as ‘incredibly pioneering,’ a solution to the devastating health state of the UK.

Let’s food educate!

The first and most important step when it comes to cutting down on sugar is food education: check the ingredients and the nutrition information panel. We consume more added sugar through processed food and sugary drinks than we might think: cakes, biscuits, cereals, chocolate, savoury food, non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks.

Manufacturers are not making our life easier. They can list sugars added to food and drinks under various names: table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, glucose, syrup, honey, fructose, molasses, fruit-juice concentrates, brown sugar, agave nectar, barley malt, evaporated cane juice, starch, maple syrup, rice syrup, ethyl maltol, corn sweetner.

Nutritionists, scientists, professors and personal trainers all agree that we can consume sugar in moderation. The key is treating sugary foods as a treat and not an everyday option for hydration and nourishment. We should opt for sugars that have less fructose content such as rice malt syrup, which is 100% fructose-free, or stevia, a plant-derived sweetener, which contains no sugar of any kind.

People do not like to be told what to eat or not to eat, and they should not be. Healthy means different to everyone. There has to be freedom of choice, but I firmly believe without food education and clarity in food labelling we cannot make the right choices. I cheer all the magazines, newspapers, health bloggers and Jamie Olivers for spreading the word, educating and inspiring us to live and eat healthier.

 

pictures: from Pinteres

Sugar: Aren’t we sweet enough?

 Aren’t we sweet enough?

Although it is not known where sugar originated, it is thought to have been used, along with honey as natural sweeteners for thousands of years. Sugar, once a luxury product, known also as ”white gold,” enjoyed by a few only a couple of centuries ago, has now been linked to health conditions such as: Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay and obesity.  Let me take you on a journey to discover together the history and modern day life of sugar.

Firstly, when we talk about sugar we need to differentiate between two types of sugars. Sugars found in vegetables, fruits, dairy products are naturally occurring sugars, or “natural sugars”, such as fructose and lactose. Following the vocabulary of the NHS and World Health Organization, I will call “free or added sugar” those sugars that are added to food in order to sweeten, enhance flavour and to preserve foods. Free sugars offer no nutritional value and thus eating, drinking too much of them will result in adding extra calories and gaining weight.

WHO recommends us to reduce our free sugar intake to less than 10% of our total energy intake, and encourages us to further reduce it below 5%. Let’s talk facts: 5% of your daily calories is about 25 grams or 6 teaspoons of sugar. NHS claims that Britons eat about 700g of sugar a week that is 140 teaspoons per person. That is more than three times more of the recommended sugar intake.

In my opinion, the first and most important step when it comes to cutting down on sugar is checking the nutrition information panel. We consume more added sugar through processed food and sugary drinks than we might think: cakes, biscuits, cereals, chocolate, savoury food, non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks. Sugars added to food and drinks can be listed under various names: table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, glucose, syrup, honey, dextrose, fructose, treacle, molasses, fruit-juice concentrates, brown sugar, agave nectar, barley malt, evaporated cane juice, caramel, carob syrup, beet sugar, galactose, icing sugar, invert sugar, maltodextrin, starch, raw sugar, sorbitol, muscovado, maple syrup, mannitol, panocha, rice syrup, diastase, ethyl maltol, sorghum syrup, dextran, diastatic malt, date sugar, turbinado, corn sweetner, maltotroise.

Always check the ingredients list: if one of the various forms of sugar is high up on the list, it is high in sugar. “High-sugar food” contains more than 22.5g per 100g, on the other hand “low-sugar food” contains less than 5 g per 100g. Look for food with 5 g or less sugar in it per 100g. “High-sugar drink” contains 11.25g per 100ml, a “low-sugar drink” contains less than 2.5g per 100ml. “Sugar is sugar, whether it’s white, brown, unrefined sugar, molasses or honey, don’t kid yourself: there is no such thing as healthy sugar”, reminds us NHS dietitian Catherine Collins.

I would like to make this post on sugar into a series of posts and talk about possible ways of cutting down on sugar, prevention and solutions. In order to make healthier choices, I think it is also very important to fully understand what happens to our body when we eat high-sugar foods. So, I would like to discuss the topic from that angle as well.

I hope you’ve found this post interesting and helpful. I really enjoyed reading and learning about sugar and wanted to share it with you.

picture from: pinterest

information from: http://www.nhs.uk ; http://www.who.int ; Health Magazin September 2015 issue, http://www.bda.uk.com

Overcoming Bad Habits – BYN 2.

Beautify Your Nails, 2nd part

A week ago I wrote about overcoming bad habits (post: “Beautify Your Nails”), and my habit of nail biting.
Another week, actually a week and a half passed since then and my nails are still long. We went grocery shopping today and I wandered away and found myself in the beauty section (what a coincidence). When I saw this orange nail polish I knew it was the One. Don’t ask me why, I guess I just wanted a vivid color that reminds me of summer. Because it’s still so cold outside. I can’t wait for spring to come. And, it does the job perfectly, my nails cheer me up just by looking at them.

As I said, it’s so important to celebrate even the tiniest achievement. It gives you enough strength to go on and overcome the next obstacle. I was celebrating this time with buying a new nail polish and more selfies.

Here’s my recipe for success: (hope you find it useful)

1. Pay attention and understand: The most essential thing to overcome bad habits, I find, is paying close attention to yourself to understand your habit. Let’s stick to my nail biting. I always try to catch myself in the moment and understand what has just happened that triggered the necessity of my biting my nails. In my case I find it’s stress, worrying and so much more. If I can catch myself in the midst of my thoughts and become conscious of my action just when it’s about to happen I know I have a very good chance to prevent my nail biting. It’s a matter of seconds, let me tell you.

2. Change your thoughts: You can always change your thoughts, your thought pattern. By changing it you ultimately change your mood and the way you feel in your body. “Peace is a thought away!”

3. Love yourself: Never punish yourself! Doesn’t matter if you fail, what matters is that you get back up and try again. Tomorrow is a new day. Love and accept yourself, and work from this place of tranquility to change whatever needs to be changed in your life.

4. Stay positive and motivated: I love Oprah and her interviews. They give me so much inspiration and motivation to go on and follow my path. I like walking to work. It takes me about 30 minutes, those 30 minutes give me the perfect opportunity to listen to such life and world view changing interviews, and you do some exercise at the same time. 😉 The other day I was listening to her interview with Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, a Harvard-trained neuroscientist, about her book “My Stroke of Insight.” It’s a very interesting interview about her having a stroke and her life afterwards. She says here that “peace is a thought away,” and it just stroke something inside me. Here’s the link if you’re interested:

I always make sure to listen to or read such inspirational interviews. They help me stay positive and motivated.

5. Get active: I also find physical exercise useful when it comes to bad habits. I believe physical exercise as such gives you a healthy self-esteem, positive energy and positive thoughts that help you overcome the lows and stay strong.

6.Talk about it: Talk with your friends, your parents. If you feel like you need an outsider’s opinion there are so many platforms out there where you can find people with the same issues. Sharing and talking about it with others may give you a different perspective. If you can’t share it with the world, share it with yourself, write it down on a piece of paper.

7. Write about it: Write down the pros and contras of your habit. Why are you so afraid to let go of the habit? What’s withholding you to change? How would life be once you overcome the habit? Seeing the pros and contras will give you a deep insight, but be very honest with yourself.

8. Visualize: (this should have come at the very top of my list) Visualize the new, happier you!

Good luck all’ya beautiful people! We can do it!

Beautify Your Nails – Overcoming bad habits

Don’t be ashamed of your bad habits.

Bad habits are like mistakes. You need to own them, admit them so you can work on them.

This blog’s supposed to be about my lifestyle change, and a post about my nail biting habits wouldn’t really fit the profile of my blog, I thought. And, who would want to hear about it anyways? Then, I looked at my nails and thought to myself: “You should be proud of yourself and share your success”.

So, here it is:

My NAILS are long, and they look so healthy. I’m so proud that I had to go to the shop to buy a new nail polish. I dressed up, put some make up on and it was time to take some selfies, and celebrate! So vain, lol.

I’ve been biting my nails since I can remember. It’s a nasty habit, which is almost impossible to stop. I can’t remember when or how it started. I’m in my 30s and I still couldn’t quite figure out what triggers the whole mechanism of nail biting. I tried all sorts of things but nothing really helped in the long run.

I’ve decided today that I’m gonna turn this bad habit into a good one and celebrate each and every step of it. Every week I’ll buy a new nail polish and beautify my nails. I want to try all the colors out there, I wanna go wild. I’ve been using for months now organic hand creams, and the mixture of pure coconut, argan, avocado, rosehip and sweet almond oil to nourish my hands and nails. My nails definitely got stronger and healthier since then.

I always envied people who had nice, long nails. If you’ve ever bitten your nails and you’re a girl, you know how horrible nail polish looks on short, bitten nails. When you bite your nails, you always want to hide your hands from people. It’s not a nice site to look at, and you know it. There’s a Hungarian saying: “The hands are the mirror of the soul”. How true that is!

Own your bad habits. Work on them. It doesn’t matter if you fall. Stand up and try again. In the meantime, don’t forget to celebrate every little step. Each little step you take towards a new, healthier, fuller life will add up at the end and you’ll see it was worth the effort.

Eat Yourself Happy

New fave: Beetroot Juice!

This juice that you can see in the picture is actually really nice. It’s 90% beetroot and 10% apple. The other day, I tried one that was 100% beetroot; had to mix it with orange juice cause I couldn’t drink it on its own.
My mom used to make a homemade juice for me every morning with beetroot+carrots+apple and sometimes other fruits as well, whatever there was in our garden. Nothing beets homemade, especially when you grow the ingredients in your own garden.
Unfortunately, I don’t have a garden at the moment or a juicer either! I really need to buy a juicer 😀 I’ve been planning to buy one for ages, can’t postpone it anymore.

Note to self: always find time for a healthy snack in between 2 meals! Take the time and make sure it’s rich with vitamins and gives (healthy) fuel to your body.

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“Milk for Humans”

Well, Hello Oat Milk!

In my last blog I was writing about my experimenting with different types of non-dairy milk: coconut, coconut- rice combo, almond, rice. From the above mentioned types my favourite was the rice milk until I’ve found this Swedish oat milk. It’s delicious!!! Today I found myself drinking it out of the box 😉 I think that’s a sign of our eternal friendship. Coffee, porridge, cereals just taste delicious with this milk. There are still two types of milk I wanna try: hemp and cashew milk.
I’m 99.9% sure I’ll stick to oat milk, though. As I said, it’s delicious and most of all it’s affordable, and I totally adore it’s box. On each box, there’s a different picture, message, piece of information about the company and oat… It’s just way too original, and there’s an organic version as well.

The are two more things I wanted to write about:

~~~ One was about how to stay strong and focused when a piece of cake is staring back at you from the fridge. That was a tough moment for me as I love all sorts of sweets, chocolates, ice creams and the list could go on forever. I’ve been tempted so many times in this last month since I started my non-dairy diet.
What I do in moments like this is : I take a deep breath and remind myself that “it isn’t worth it.” A slice of yummie cake or a piece of biscuit are NOT worth the pain and the bloating…
Best of all, as a reward, I feel awesome and healthy in my body. Because of the restrictions on what I can and cannot eat, I always need to rethink my diet and thanks to that I keep losing weight. (Yes, I exercise as well, which is turning into a slight obsession now, but I don’t mind) As the days are passing, I crave less and less for “unhealthy”* food. (* by “unhealthy” I mean food that is not good for my health, food that contains dairy)

~~~There’s one more thing that’s been kinda bugging me and wanted to write about. That is: Eating Out! I don’t eat out a lot, a couple of times a month maybe, but there are days when I like to grab a sandwich on the go but it’s been a mission impossible most of the time. Well, that’s what Internet is for, right?! To find vegetarian and such restaurants, where you can find “healthy” food on the menu. I shall do that. In my next blog, I’ll write about my eating out experience.

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The Dairy-free Experiment

I haven’t written on my blog for ages, so, first of all, I wanted to apologize! I’m back because I wanted to account my experience of a dairy-free diet.2015/01/img_1509.jpg

I’ve been trying to follow a dairy-free diet for about two weeks now. My decision was more out of necessity than out of a conscious decision. I had been watching myself and my diet for about two months when I decided it was time to go to a nutritionist. I wasn’t sure if it was the dairy or the gluten that made me bloat and my stomach hurt etc. Anybody who has intolerance or allergic reactions to certain types of food, knows what I’m talking about.

It turned out I have lactose intolerance. I didn’t take it too bad, as I knew something was going on in my body, and I really wanted to find out what it was and change diet if I needed too. Who needs gases and painful bloating and so on in his/her life, right?

Two weeks down the road, i can tell you what seemed impossible and awfully difficult two weeks ago, turned out to be not so difficult. As a friend of mine said, once you learn to substitute certain types of food it gets easy. And, she was right, it is getting easier.

Milk itself wasn’t an issue, as I preferred soya milk with my coffees and cereals… but all those yummie cheeses, yogurts, ice creams. Then, when you go “conscious” shopping for the first time and you realize there are so many products that have milk, yogurt in it, and you just can’t have them anymore. What a Bomer! The nutritionist said, and I remember my mom mentioning it as well to me, I shouldn’t consume too much soya milk because of the level of phytoestrogen. Now, I’m deprived of my soya milk, as well.

So my experimenting started to find the perfect substitution for cow milk and soya milk for my morning coffees. I’m very fussy when it comes to coffee. It has to be the perfect temperature, the perfect amount of milk in it, otherwise my morning is ruined, lol.  I started with almond milk. The sweetened one was too sweet for me, as I don’t take sugar with my coffees. The unsweetened one didn’t taste like anything at all. It was like having a horrible black coffee. One day, I found an unsweetened rice+coco milk combo. This worked fine with my coffee, it was coco-licious but still too sweet for my taste. Then I’ve found rice milk, it was love at first sight. Hurray for rice milk! My experimentation won’t stop here there are still a few “milk” out there I need to try but for now, I am more than happy with my rice milk.

When you change you’re diet you’re forced to make drastic changes for your health and well-being. I definitely feel healthier, and I started loosing weight as well. I need to do some research, though, regarding vitamin intakes and how to achieve a healthy, balanced dairy-free diet.

In my next post I’ll write about the challenges I face when it comes to dairy-free products and how to stay strong when you find a cake in your fridge, that you can’t have. lol. If you have any feedback, useful information on dairy-free diet I’d love to hear from you! Let’s help each other with sharing our experiences!


Rice Milk – The CheapO in Town (my redefinition of cheapo)

I’ve checked the meaning of “cheapo” in the dictionary: # inexpensive and of poor quality # – I didn’t like what I read 😉

I considered myself a cheapo, in a positive way.

I like nice, quality things but I love a bargain. I like saving a penny/cent here and there but I don’t mind paying a bit more for quality, healthy, earth- and people-friendly products. But when I see something the questions :’Can I get it cheaper? Can I make it myself? Do I really need this? are always on my mind.

I think it runs in my family. I got this from my mom and grandma. And, Surprise, surprise! my husband turns out to be from the ‘CheapOtribe’ as well. My grandma would always say farewell to me with one advice: Be a “spórmajszter,” which could be translated as ‘Be a master of your money aka. Be mindful of your spending.’ The Hungarian word grabs the essence of a lifestyle of mindfulness about spending your money wisely. I hold dearly the positive connotations of this word and will stick with me for the rest of my life. The wisdom of older generations amaze me, behind their simplicity there’s so much wisdom, so much to learn.

When I use the word “cheapo,” the wisdom of my grandma comes to me and I’m happy to use this word when referring to myself.

I was in the shop the other day looking for some alternatives to milk. I found soya and rice milk for a price I would never pay. So the cheapo in me started the chatter: ” @@@### there has to be a cheaper and smarter option @@@###.” So I walked away with a sad face.

2 days later I was sitting at home reading a yoga book about how to make your own soya milk when the idea struck me: “Girl, DIY your rice milk!!!”

So I started my research and since then I have my morning coffees with my homemade rice milk. (I’m not gonna lie – I’ve tasted better things in my life, but for a healthier life you have to be willing… or should I just quit coffee altogether? naaaaah, not ready for that one yet)

The way I did my RICE MILK:

  • 1 small cup of brown, organic rice
  • about 10 cups of water
  • pinch of salt

ricemilk.jpg1. picture: mixture in the blander   2. the cup I used, and how much it made

Again, you can find so many recipes out there. Surf around and check youtube if not sure.

  1. Let the rice soak in 8 cups of water for 36 hours
  2. Put it in a bowl +salt and cook till its tender
  3. Put the mix in your blender with 2 cups of fresh water.
  4. The mix you get is creamy
  5. Filter the mixture into a jar or bottle (use a funnel and a strainer)
  6. Add more water if you want to thin it out
  7. Consume within 7 days
  8. You can add sugar, xilit or any kind of product to sweeten your milk (I don’t like my coffee sweet, so I left mine unsweetened)

I think I should DIY oat and coconut milk, as well, in the future…

…till then #Chilex and Enjoy your Morning Coffees#

oh, and remember #To Be a CheapO is Cool#

DIY EGG “no poo” SHAMPOO

I’ve been shampoo free for more than a week now yaaaay 🙂 Last night my husband said he couldn’t take my greasy hair anymore, puuffff :(… but I wasn’t gonna give up my going “no poo”. I explained him how important it is to me to go “no poo” and asked him to give me another couple of weeks.

In the meantime to keep everyone happy I did a bit of research on the internet and…….. This morning I washed my hair with a DIY egg shampoo.

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 ts of soda bicarbonate
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1 ts of honey

Mix it well, apply to dry hair, to the roots mainly.

I rinsed my hair with water and as always with water+apple cider vinegar mix. I applied argan oil to the ends of my hair.

The original recipe says 1 lemon, but I read somewhere that lemon makes your hair dry, so I only put the juice of half a lemon. Plus, I’ve mixed a bit of honey into my “shampoo.”